Tag Archives: Apulum

The final results from Alba Iulia (Apulum)

We managed the final ten squares on the last day completing the area I hoped we would cover. We managed 2.6ha in seven days of survey.  The final four grid squares had an old excavation trench in the middle of them and a sea of mud from the spoilheap being bulldozed back into the hole.

Fig. 1: Stefan and Wyatt surveying in the mud.

I have left the grid on the next image (Fig. 2) which gives you some sense of scale.  The grid squares are 20x20m, and site north is to the right.

Fig. 2: the surveyed area with grid for scale.

In the next image (Fig. 3) I have labelled a few of the features.  One can easily see many of the buildings.  Because of the large differences between areas of low readings and areas of high readings I have applied a log-transform to the data to make some of the features more visible.

Fig. 3: the 0.5m survey with log-transformed data.

An alternative (and very common) method of evening-out the differences is to apply a high-pass filter (Fig. 4).  The downside to this is that areas of very high readings will often end-up with a area of very low readings next to it which are purely an artefact of the filter.  It is essential, therefore, to have several images and compare them so that you do not create features where there are none.

Fig. 4: the data after the application of a high-pass filter.

As well as the main survey with a 0.5m probe spacing (thus ‘looking’ 0.5 to 0.7m below the surface, approximately), we were simultaneously collecting 1.0m probe spacing data (which ‘looks’ about 1.0m into the ground), but at only two readings per square meter rather than four.  This extra data did not add that much more to the survey (Fig. 5), but does make the north-south road show more clearly.

Fig. 5: the 1m probe spacing data, high pass filtered.

There is quite a bit to do in terms of interpretation and drawing-up maps of the results, but I am very happy with the new results which have greatly improved an already excellent set of results from 2002/3.

The journey home seemed to go on for ever, but at least I had some entertainingly-named beer on the way!

Fig. 6: Munich Hell.

Many thanks to the whole team, and especially to Stefan, Wyatt, Doru and Ian.

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Somewhat tired

On Friday the snow kept on coming and we had to abandon the survey for the day. It gave us the chance to explore the citadel and visit the museum.

Fig. 1: Carol’s Gate, Alba Iulia.

The snow had stopped yesterday morning so we headed out to site once more. During the day the snow cover slowly melted and we managed an excellent eleven grids, although two of those were small partials.  Today, the weather improved…

Fig. 2: Stefan surveying.

I even ended-up with sun-burnt ears!

Having lost time through airline incompetence and snow, we were determined to try and catch-up and we managed twelve 20x20m grids at 0.5m intervals with just the two of us.  To say our feet ached would be an English understatement.  We did, however, get some lovely results.

Fig. 3: the half-meter probe spacing survey at the end of Sunday.

We believe that the thin line on the right hand side of the plot running diagonally is the line of the town wall.  We seem to have picked-up a set of three small buttresses on the inside of the wall.  We have some more buildings at the top of the plot.  Obviously, there is a great deal going on in this data and a detailed interpretation will take a little longer.

Tomorrow our target is the ten grids along the top edge of the survey to complete the block and join the survey up with the earlier excavations.  It is tempting, however, to try and survey a little more at the top to see what those two pairs of parallel lines are doing!

I’d like to thank the whole team but especially Stefan who has worked really hard, and Wyatt who has also helped a great deal, and also Ian Haynes and Doru Bogdan who made the whole trip possible.  The whole team have been great to work with and made what could have been a trying experience great fun.

Of snow and sheep

Yesterday started off well. The weather was a little cold, but other than that it wasn’t too bad.  Then it started to snow.  The snow was OK, not too much.  Then it snowed some more.  And a bit more…

Fig. 1: surveying in the snow.

Just to add to the delights, we had a visitation from some sheep.  They charged past me where I was laying in the grid for the next square, and surrounded the team using the res.

Fig. 2: The sheep visit the survey.

Fig. 3: The sheep visit the survey (heavily cropped photo).

By lunchtime, it was getting silly, and we packed-up.

Fig. 4: Getting silly.

We did, however, get some very nice results from both the 0.5m probe-spacing data and the 1m -probe spacing data (the latter “looks” a bit deeper into the soil).

Fig. 5: the 0.5m probe-spacing data.

Fig. 6: the 1m probe-spacing data.

The dark line running diagonally across the plot is a Roman road with a subsidiary road running off it at an angle.  The excavations were at the far left-hand side of the image.  The buildings along the road are pretty clear.  Both these images have been high-pass filtered to bring out the structures.

Although the landscape is covered in snow, it isn’t actively snowing at the moment, so I suspect we will be going out again today.

And now for somewhere completely different

Although this isn’t CAGG related, or Hertfordshire, I thought members of the group might be interested in my latest geophysical adventures.

Some 15 years ago I undertook a survey in Alba Iulia, Romania, for a colleague.   The site was part of one of the Roman cities at Apulum which grew-up alongside the legionary fortress.  The results were pretty good, but I was only taking one reading per square meter.  Since getting the RM85 I have been wanting to return and re-do the survey at higher resolution.  Well, be careful what you wish for!  Last Saturday, I found myself on the way…

Fig. 1: On my way…

Yes, you did read the time correctly.  I flew to Cluj-Napoca via Munich.  Sadly, when I got to Cluj, my luggage was still in Munich.  Thankfully, they delivered it all safe-and-sound the next day but it did mean I lost a half day of survey.

Alba Iulia has changed quite a bit in the fifteen years.  The citadel, especially, has been restored beautifully and now has a series of bronze statues decorating the area.

Fig. 2: scrumping.

Having lost half a day, we got started in the afternoon.  Three whole grids and partial that day, seven whole grids a four partials (including one very silly small one) the next day, and eleven yesterday.

Fig 3: Wyatt helping with the Earth Resistance survey.

Yesterday, going along the first line seemed fine with the wind at my back.  Then I turned into the howling gale and snow…  The effect was like star-trails in a science fiction movie as the snow blew past me horizontally.  Thankfully, the weather got better during the day.

There were some software issues to begin with, but thanks to David Wilborn’s excellent customer support, those were quickly resolved.  The results look pretty good.  In the next image I have applied a high-pass filter to even out the big changes in range that occur in this data set.

Fig. 4: the Earth Resistance survey results at the end of Day 3.

I’ll update you all as I go along.  I have six more days to try and complete the whole survey.  I suspect I’ll be a little tired by the end.

Your foreign correspondent.