Being completist

Anyone new to this blog or geophysics in archaeology is recommended to read the material on the “Geophysical survey in archaeology” page.

The team are very patient with my need to be neat and tidy and do the silly little bits around the edges.  Today was perhaps an extreme example.  Due to yesterday’s little hiccup, I set-up the res kit and, with Graham’s help, surveyed about a sixth of a grid square, then packed it all up again.  Now I can sleep easy.  On a more ambitious note, I have finally put all the res grid squares into one large composite.  The survey now consists of nine hectares, which is about 360,000 individual readings.  Most Earth Resistance surveys use what is known as a twin-probe configuration.  That means that there are two mobile probes on the frame, and two stationary probes on the end of a long cable, normally about half a meter apart.  One mobile probe, and one remote probe set-up an electric circuit part of which is the soil.  The other mobile probe and the other remote probe measure the resistance.  The problem with this “standard” set-up is that when you have to move the remote probes, the readings for the same spot will change.  This leads to endless struggles to “grid-match” each set of squares.  Since 2016 I have gone over to using a pole-pole configuration.  This is basically the same except the remote probes are a long way away (I aim for about 30m or more) and a long way apart from each other (I aim for more than 20m). This helps enormously with the grid matching.  Grids completed on different days of the survey will match quite nicely, usually.  Where this is not true is when (a) there is a lot of rain in the middle of a survey and (b) when the survey is split over multiple years.  In the case of our 9ha block, this has been completed over four seasons.  Unsurprisingly, one can see the edges.  TerraSurveyor has a function called “periphery match” which will, sometimes, do an excellent job of grid matching.  In this case, it was pretty good.  Figure 1 shows the survey with a periphery match applied.

Figure 1: the res survey as of the end of Thursday.

If you click on the image and see it full size you can see the detail of many buildings.  Unfortunately, the range of values makes seeing some buildings quite hard.  A high-pass filter is a background trend removing tool that makes some buildings show more clearly (Figure 2).

Figure 2: the res survey, high-pass filtered.

There are still many features, many buildings, that one can only see when looking at smaller blocks.  With such a big area getting everything to look clear is going to be impossible, I fear.

From tomorrow the res will be working in Church Meadow where we hope it will map the remains of St Mary du Pré.

The GPR team is getting really close to finishing the theatre field (Figure 3).

Figure 3: the GPR survey so far.

The team have some fiddly bits around the edges to complete, one missed block, and one block we want to re-survey at 50cm intervals as there is a building and road in it.  Fingers crossed, two more days should do it.  Then, for a bit of last day fun, the GPR will also have a look at St Mary du Pré.

The mag team completed another eight blocks today.  Since moving to Church Meadow, they have managed to survey four hectares in three days which is very impressive, especially given that one block had to be repeated due to a sensor freeze.  Having lots of whole grids and no partials makes such a difference.  The team are now just 2.5 ha away from completing a square kilometer of mag at Verulamium.  Figure 4 shows the mag results in Church Meadow.

Figure 4: Church Meadow mag survey after day 3.

Three things are of note.  Firstly, earlier today I wondered which of the two raised areas in the field was Watling Street.  Looking at the survey results, it looks like the road splits in two near the edge of our survey.  Perhaps it is two phases?  I’m not convinced.  Secondly, we have some marked linear features showing that almost look like enclosures.  These are, however, low magnetism suggesting and might be yet more pipes, but not of metal this time?  Again, I’m not convinced.  They might well be archaeological features.  I will have to survey all the pipes I can see in the field.  Lastly, as we get closer to the town to the south, there are many more little black blobs.  Seasoned readers of this blog will know that usually little black blobs in mag data are often pits.  In this case, I wonder if we are starting to pick up the edge of the cemetery which is likely to have lined Watling Street?  In the Roman world, the richer you were, the closer you wanted to be buried to the road and the town.

Tomorrow is the antepenultimate day of the 2019 Gorhambury survey season.  The weather looks good so fingers crossed all goes well.

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