Saving the best ’til last?

Anyone new to this blog or geophysics in archaeology is recommended to read the material on the “Geophysical survey in archaeology” page.

Unfortunately the weather forecast was accurate yesterday.  Far too much rain for us to go out and play.  Today, however, was very pleasant and at least the pegs went in very easily for a change! I’m afraid that a new toy (Figure 1) resulted in me getting a late start processing data this evening, and so I only have the mag and res to report on.  The GPR team, however, did a sterling job and completed a multitude to sawtooth-edged grids along the western side of the theatre field.  I promise I’ll process all that tomorrow!

Figure 1: Kris’ new multiformat pinhole camera being put through its paces.

The Earth Resistance meter was operated by John and Grahame. We have moved north of the hedge line and are close to the cross-roads around which both mag and GPR have shown multiple buildings.  Figure 2 shows the entire res survey, and Figure 3 a zoomed-in view of today’s area.

Figure 2: the Earth Resistance survey so far.

Figure 3: the area surveyed today and some context.

We have just clipped the edge of Street 11 (in the top-right corner of the new block) and have revealed some wonderfully clear images of the buildings to the south of that street.  These are clearer than the GPR survey of the same area, so it is really pleasing to see.  Excellent stuff!

Over in Prae Wood field, the mag team completed two more strips of grid squares.  Figure 4 shows the survey so far.

Figure 4: the Prae Wood Field survey, so far.

Two more days should, weather and equipment willing, see the team finish the field.  After Prae Wood we are heading north into Church Meadow, so-called because St Mary du Pré lies within that field.  Watling Street also runs through it so we should get some exciting results.

But, back to Prae Wood.  Let us look in more detail at the western end of the survey (Figure 5).

Figure 5: the western side of the mag survey of Prae Wood field.

The dark lines in the new area represent ditches, and it looks like we have some enclosures running across this western end of the field.  Given that the major Iron Age settlement lies in the wood just to the SW, these could be of that date, but they could be Roman or medieval as well.  Once more, we need to check out the historic map data.  Still, after many blank grid we now have features in both the western and eastern extensions of this field.  Saving the best for last?

Many thanks to everyone who turned out today.  Tomorrow looks like we might have to pack-up early due to yet more rain. This season is just flying by.

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