Seven red kites, two fire engines and a microlight

Anyone new to this blog or geophysics in archaeology is recommended to read the material on the “Geophysical survey in archaeology” page.

It was an eventful day. At lunch seven red kites descended on some tasty tit-bit not far from where we were sitting, and in the afternoon two fire engines drove up the drive and we were “buzzed” by someone in a microlight. None of this has anything to do with the geophysics, however!

The mag team completed the last two grids in Mobbs Hole (for now), and have started on the field to the south.  The first six grids were all wheel-spinning partials too.  They have, however, only one partial left and then there are eleven whole grids laid-out and waiting.  Partials are not the Foerster’s strong point.  The lack of an “end line” function means hours are wasted spinning the wheel to fool the odometer into thinking we have completed the line.  Open fields, however, are its strength and the team will be glad to be out in the wilds again.  Figures 1 and 2 show the results from Mobbs Hole.

Figure 1: the Mobbs Hole survey in its entirety.

Figure 2: the southern area completed today and the start of the next field.

The GPR team had a partial around the water trough this afternoon and so they didn’t quite complete their usual 80x40m block (I knew I should have kept quiet yesterday).  The next two figures are nine time slices of the western and eastern halves of the block.

Figure 3: time slices from the day 16 GPR data, western block.

Figure 4: Day 16 GPR data, eastern block.

The western block seems to be yet-more blobby stuff, although with some very strong reflections.  The western block, however, has some clearly recognisable Roman-style corridor houses.  Yay! Finally some buildings we can recognise!

The last two images show slice 6 in context, firstly on the mag data, and then the mag data with an outline of the location of the GPR blocks.

Figure 5: GPR data from day 16, slice 6.

Figure 6: mag data with the location of the Day 16 GPR data indicated by the red box.

The huge black and white feature in the middle of the mag plot (Figure 6) is the water trough. As you can see, some of the walls of the buildings show in the mag data, but are much clearer in the GPR data.  Some only show in the GPR.  I know I am beginning to sound like a stuck record, but that is the strength of multi-method survey.

Tomorrow is our antepenultimate day (I had to get that in once again), so fingers crossed for dry weather.

Many thanks to the whole team for their wonderful effort and commitment.

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