The mystery deepens

We managed to run all three machines today, although we were short handed on the resistance meter so many thanks to Peter and Ellen for soldiering-on. The unfortunate side-effect of the lovely weather is the top surface of the field is now like concrete!

First of all, the resistance results.

Day 27 resistance results.

Day 27 resistance results.

Day 27 resistance results, high pass filtered.

Day 27 resistance results, high pass filtered.

Not much new showing today, but we are getting a little more of the temple.  Tomorrow’s grids should show quite a bit more, if we can get the probes in the ground!

The GPR has, for the last few days, been working its way along the northern edge of the field in a series of stepped blocks.  With GPR it is not so easy to have a ragged edge.  Mike Smith, our expert GPR cart wrangler, felt sure they had found some stuff today.  Here are the last three days (the three blocks with jagged top edges) with today’s being the easternmost one.

GPR survey, days 25--27 (slices vary).

GPR survey, days 25–27 (slices vary).

Timeslice 3 (12.5 to 15.5ns) is usually a good starting place at this site.  Not much showing in that bottom block.  How about the next slice down?

GPR survey, days 25 to 27. Day 27 (the easternmost block with a jagged north edge), slice 4 (15.5 to 18.5 ns).

GPR survey, days 25 to 27. Day 27 (the easternmost block with a jagged north edge), slice 4 (15.5 to 18.5 ns).

I think Mike is right!  Excellent stuff.  Let us look a little closer at today’s block:

Detail showing day 27 results, 4th time slice (15.5 to 18.5 ns).

Detail showing day 27 results, 4th time slice (15.5 to 18.5 ns).

What is really interesting is not only do we have evidence of yet another building in the western side of today’s block, but the white lines surrounding darker areas on the eastern side suggest robbed walls of a large building.  Tomorrow’s results are going to be very interesting!

And to the topic of the TLA from the post earlier this evening.  Let us recap the story.  Last year we started picking-up a long ditch which ran right across the site.  It had been found in the two transects of mag undertaken by English Heritage in 2000, but at the time they were not linked. Last year we speculated that the ditch ran up the dry valley that the mag team have been laboring up and down the last few days.  On the 19th century maps there is a well marked on the other side of the Fosse field.  In the next image I have marked the line of the ditch.

The sinuous ditch.

The sinuous ditch.

Much to my surprise, the ditch curves around on itself at the western end, perhaps following the contours of the sides/bottom of the valley.  I will have to check that with the dGPS in the near future.  But where is it going?  Is it still an aqueduct as we thought, or something else entirely?

Looking more closely, we can see there are lots of other, smaller linear features in the area, some quite straight, and possibly even another building.  This top-corner of the field is proving very interesting and we will have to overlay the results on the topography to see what is happening.  This bit of the field is anything but flat!

Detail of the western end of the sinuous ditch.

Detail of the western end of the sinuous ditch.

Tomorrow we see the mag team edging closer to completing the Theatre Field, the GPR working along the northern edge towards the theatre and the the resistance meter covering more of the Insula XVI temple.

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